Author(s): Shabina Fatma, Sunita Rani

Email(s): shabinafatma7@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2349-2988.2024.00003   

Address: Shabina Fatma*, Sunita Rani
Department of Forensic Science, Jharkhand Raksha Shakti University, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India - 834008
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 16,      Issue - 1,     Year - 2024


ABSTRACT:
Although geographically, soil varies from one area to another, from forensic point of view it varies from spot to spot even in the same area because of the specific localized prevailing conditions such as contamination of soil with nature or man made debris, animal remains, organic materials, industrial waste fertilizers etc. therefore the soil at two different spots would be invariably different and distinguishable. Soil forensic characterization is primarily performed in the laboratory, it is emphasized that soil analysis typically begins with the sampling and description of three distinct groups of samples, which are categorized as follows: (i) questioned soil samples whose origin is unknown or disputed – often from a suspect or victim (ii) control soil samples whose origin is known – often from sites such as the crime scene. Soil contains microscopic particles called dust. It can be very characteristic of particular places, such as building sites, coal cellers, workshops or flour mills. Similarly, soil near railway tracks, wells, factories, or soils of the fields have surface conditions. Such a contamination of soil with natural or man-made debris, animal remains, organic materials, industrial wastes and fertilizers, etc contribute towards specific local conditions and helps in characterization of soil.


Cite this article:
Shabina Fatma, Sunita Rani. Forensic Examination of Soil Evidence. Research Journal of Science and Technology. 2024; 16(1):11-8. doi: 10.52711/2349-2988.2024.00003

Cite(Electronic):
Shabina Fatma, Sunita Rani. Forensic Examination of Soil Evidence. Research Journal of Science and Technology. 2024; 16(1):11-8. doi: 10.52711/2349-2988.2024.00003   Available on: https://rjstonline.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2024-16-1-3


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